World Mental Health Day and further musings.

So, today is World Mental Health Day and we were going to make a HUGE deal out of it but, as is typical, we all seem to be in low function mode right now. It’s a bit of a daft time of year for this sort of thing really… Most people who suffer with mental health conditions in this country notice a marked difference in their mood when the days start to darken… So the chances of us being productive at this time of year are much slimmer than in, say, May or June…

You may have noticed that we’ve been a bit quieter and if you were with us last year, you’ll probably have noticed it then too… The team is made up of disabled people and so, we made the decision very early on that we would not try to fight this and would, instead, go with the flow. Therefore, we’re going into hibernation mode!

Don’t worry! We’re not completely gone, we’re just not going to be working much until the Spring comes. We’re still here if you need us and we hope that you can join in our conversations in the support group and will still feel confident in coming to us if you need our support but there will be slow progress in our usual work for the next few months.

We hope to see you at our festival in a few weeks though, as that is definitely still going on!

On a more personal note, you may have noticed that i’m being quieter than usual… Some of you may have even noticed why! This time of year always has a bizarre effect on me… I tend to be a little more… Difficult, let’s say difficult, for the sake of being polite… I’m a little more difficult at this time of year and so i try to take myself out of situations where i may cause offence or upset… Well… That is… I do when i start noticing that i’m doing it… Which is usually after i’ve caused a bit of trouble… And it seems i’ve come to this point now! So, with this in mind, i’ll see you on the other side of this… Whatever it is… And i sincerely hope i see none of you during it! 😉

Stay safe, be blessed and much love!

xXx Debi xXx

Health Information Week

As a Staffordshire library assistant I’m very aware of the various campaigns run throughout the year to provide services for the public; your local library can provide a wealth of information and services for all walks of life from Baby Bounce and Rhyme sessions to access to Ancestry and Genealogy websites and training in the use of computers.

The beginning of July sees Health Information week, which the NHS explains as:

“Health Information Week is a multi-sector campaign to promote the good quality health resources that are available to the public. This campaign aims to encourage partnership working across sectors and benefit all staff and the public by raising awareness of the resources that are available to them.”

http://kfh.libraryservices.nhs.uk/patient-and-public-information/health-information-week/

But basically it’s about promoting good health practice and communication so that you know who to contact and who/how to get in touch.

Here in Staffordshire for example, this includes stalls and displays on a wide variety of health themes from Mental health and the availability of books on prescription* through to arthritis support and blood pressure testing, the  NHS site suggests that Health information week should help promote the following

Reduce the number of people who smoke
•Reduce obesity / increase exercise
•Support sensible drinking
•Improve sexual health
•Improve mental health and wellbeing
•Tackle health inequalities

Throughout the UK libraries will be running similar projects so it’s always worth popping in and having a word if you do need information.

*https://www.staffordshire.gov.uk/leisure/librariesnew/whatsavailable/Reading/Reading-for-Health/Reading-for-Health.aspx

Carl Johnson – District Disabilities Liaison for Mid-West & Wales.

Happy Feet with Muddy Podiatrist

As June is Feet for Life month, Jenny has asked me to write a guest blog
on foot health for all of you lovely lot. I am currently training to be
a podiatrist and will quite happily ramble about feet to anyone who will
listen. I was told I would have a captive audience so grab a cup of tea
and a biscuit, make yourself comfortable and we’ll begin. Please feel
free to stop me if I’m still going next Tuesday.

It’s quite difficult to pick a foot health topic that will be relevant
to every member of our disability community so I am going to go broad
and simple.

Look at your feet. If you don’t have feet, look at your legs, stumps,
knees or whatever lower extremity you have. Really look. What does your
skin look like? Any cuts or bits of hard skin? Has that mole always been
there? Do your nails need a trim? When was the last time you had a
really good look at your own feet?

If you have diabetes, I’m really hoping that you’ve had at least a
cursory look in the last 24 hours. Diabetes causes damage to nerves and
blood vessels, meaning that if someone with the condition gets a cut on
their foot not only might they be unable to feel it due to nerve damage,
but the lack of blood supply also means their body is unable to heal it
effectively. I won’t put you off your garibaldi by telling you exactly
what happens if a diabetic foot ulcer is left untreated, but believe me
when I tell you it’s a scary prospect.

“But my insulin levels are fine!” I hear you cry. “Why am I
staring at the little piggy who went to market?”

Well, dear reader, there is an awful lot that can go wrong with the
lower limb if we don’t look after it properly, and the sooner you spot
any problems the greater the chances that they will be resolved quickly
and easily. Most people are familiar with how to check for breast or
testicular lumps and try to check on a fairly regular basis (I recommend
finding a buddy and checking each other), and checking your feet should
be a similar routine couple of minutes out of the month (buddy system
optional depending on your preferences).

So what did you see when you had a look?

I would imagine there would be a bit of redness in places. Probably
around the one or two littlest toes, and maybe around the big toe.
Although most people have this, it is not actually considered normal.
It’s a sign of badly fitting shoes, but as the market is filled with
badly fitting shoes there’s not a lot we can really do about this.
Just keep an eye on this for now, and seek further advice if it becomes
painful, swells, oozes or smells.

I suspect there will also be some hard skin in places. Again, not
considered normal but an unfortunate part of modern life. If it’s not
causing you any problems then we’re not going to worry too much. If it
ain’t broke, don’t fix it. If it’s getting uncomfortable or
splitting it might be time to get some further care though. Try to see a
podiatrist or a chiropodist (they’re the same thing, just use
different words to confuse people) if you can, but a doctor or
pharmacist may be able to help depending on the severity of the problem.

How is your skin looking? Is it soft and supple, or looking a bit dry?
The skin is our first line of defence against bugs and infections, so we
want to keep it in its best possible condition. And when you think that
your feet are down there on the ground with all the dust and bacteria
you realise just how easy it is for something to sneak into a patch of
flaky skin and BAM! Itching and pus and mushrooms and all sorts of
wondrous delights living under your toenails. It’s not just vanity –
moisturising saves lives, people! Or at least prevents another course of
antibiotics. But that’s important too.

And then there’s the one that everyone forgets – moles. When people
get a mole that looks a little iffy on their back the first thought is
to get it checked out with the doctor. Somehow, we seem to forget about
our feet. It’s the same with sun cream. If we’re going out in the
sun the factor 50 gets smeared all over arms, legs and backs, but how
often do we forget about the tops of our feet? If you’re wearing
sandals in the sun that could be a recipe for a very painful few days,
not to mention the same risk of sun damage as the rest of your skin.

It’s particularly tough to think feet if you’ve got a physical
disability that limits your movement. They are all the way down there
and tend not to complain too loudly. And you know what? Most feet are
generally pretty well behaved. The better you look after them, though,
the better they will look after you. I’m not asking for miracles, just
a quick once over every now and then so that you can spot any problems
in their early stages. After all, the earlier you catch anything going
wrong the sooner it can be dealt with and the less chance there is of
you needing more meds or expensive treatment or worse.

If you really can’t reach to see, there are loads of options
available. Ask your doctor if he can have a quick look next time
you’re seeing him. If you have a partner, carer, friend or family
member who helps put your socks on, maybe they could just have a check
every now and then. If you’ve getting your toe nails cut, ask whoever
is doing them to just have a look and let you know if there’s anything
that looks off. If you end up barefoot feeling the grass between your
toes at a ritual some time, ask your fellow participants if anyone is
feeling bold and would be willing to have a goosey while you’ve got
your shoes off already.

Just be wary about asking that one slightly odd neighbour. You know the
one I mean. The one who seems just a little too invested in your foot
health. Unless you’re into that kind of thing of course. In which
case, fill your boots.

Happy Feet for Life Month.

Muddy Podiatrist.